angrywocunited:

youngblacksamurai:

onlyblackgirl:

ask-rainbowslut:

onlyblackgirl:

pinkcookiedimples:

bombboldbeauty:

Black Egyptian excellence.

Why was Dreamworks one of the only ones who actually attempted to be historically accurate?

Cause Dreamworks isn’t all white people.

I find that to be racist to white people. And no, racism has nothing to do with people of other races Excluding white.

You find having a diverse staff racist to white people? 




Whites, especially the white supremacists, always claim that diversity is anti-white. Our existence is the biggest threat to their supremacy. 

angrywocunited:

youngblacksamurai:

onlyblackgirl:

ask-rainbowslut:

onlyblackgirl:

pinkcookiedimples:

bombboldbeauty:

Black Egyptian excellence.

Why was Dreamworks one of the only ones who actually attempted to be historically accurate?

Cause Dreamworks isn’t all white people.

I find that to be racist to white people. And no, racism has nothing to do with people of other races Excluding white.

You find having a diverse staff racist to white people? 

Whites, especially the white supremacists, always claim that diversity is anti-white. Our existence is the biggest threat to their supremacy. 

(via talkdowntowhitepeople)

project-blackbird:

Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.

Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.

Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

(via hardythehermitcrab)

micdotcom:

DreamWorks animator imagines the “Rejected Princesses” Hollywood would never touch 

While fans have taken to creating their own “racebent” versions of classic Disney characters, the question still remains: Given how many great female characters there are in history and in literature, why is Disney not willing to look outside the box?

That was the question on former DreamWorks animator Jason Porath’s mind when he launched his project “Rejected Princesses.” Describing himself as “a guy who likes interesting, lesser-known women and would like for them to get their time in the sun,” Porath decided to create Disneyfied versions of female characters who would have a hard time receiving the green light from the studio.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

(via talkdowntowhitepeople)